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Quiz: What's Blocking You?
    Which of the following best describes you?

    Deeper Look Into Handling “My Resume Doesn’t Work” Without Refunds (Core Lesson)

    Resume Doesn't Work Deeper Look - Without Refunds

    You wrote the resume and it was great, but you’ve got an unhappy client who claims it just isn’t working.

    What do you do?

    Do you offer to rewrite? Apologize? Give a partial refund? Feel stressed or lose confidence? Accept a chargeback?

    You could do any of those things.

    But instead, with this lesson you will have a:

    1. Process for dramatically reducing the risk of that happening in the future.
    2. Way to turn dissatisfaction into sales.
    3. Group of scripts you could adopt for responding easily, professionally, and positively to dissatisfied clients.

    In this lesson you will learn how to deal with issues of:

    • Offering rewrite guarantees: Are they really for you?
    • Turning around unhappy clients into repeat purchasers.
    • Reducing the time spent and money lost on clients not using the resume the way it was meant to be used.
    • Responding to clients blaming the resume in general for not landing interviews.
    • Responding to clients blaming the resume when they got the interview but not the job.
    • Responding to clients blaming the resume when recruiters are not biting.
    • Responding to clients blaming the resume when they are applying for positions out of the realm of their resume’s target.

    Last year I shared the scripts below and some ways to overcome the challenges of clients disssatisfied with their resume. I probably could have reworked the lesson, but wanted to provide a fresh approach. So now we are taking a deeper look. For convenience I’ve included the scripts again, but this time I’m going back further in the process to discuss how you lower your risk and keep from getting clients to blame the resume in the first place! So, here we go!

    Rewrite Guarantees

    First, if you have a ‘I will rewrite for free’ guarantee, then you have announced to the client that you will do this. Frankly, I never had one of these and when prospects would inquire about one, I would explain:

    “I feel that guarantees that state I will rewrite your resume for free if it doesn’t work indicate that I need to give myself an out if you are not successful. It says to me, ‘I’m not sure I’ve got this right so I’ll keep writing it until it works.’ Instead, through my proven 5-stage process of researching, interviewing, extrapolating, designing, and fine-tuning I will create the best resume for your target the first time. Of course, if you are having problems I want you to come back to me so I can help you figure out why. But I can assure you it won’t be the resume. With the few individuals I have had come back over the years, it has always been their method of job search or trying to use the resume for a different job than what it was targeted. As I am going to be explaining to you (or have already explained), the resume is a critical piece in a strategic process and not a magic bullet. You will still need to know how to use it effectively.”

    IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: I put a twist on why I don’t use rewrite guarantees because I personally wasn’t going to rewrite for free an excellent, targeted resume because someone didn’t know how to use it and thus didn’t get responses. If you have a guarantee like this and it works for you without causing a drain on your time, then go for it. We all have to defend the guarantees or lack thereof that we choose to have.

    Risk Reduction Process

    Here’s what I know: during the 14 years I ran my resume practice I never had to rewrite a single resume because of a claim it didn’t work. Nor did I receive a chargeback or process even a partial refund for resumes that allegedly didn’t work. And, in many cases I ended up making additional sales to these clients when they were reminded of what I had told them up front. Let me explain….

    This is because of several key elements:

    1. I took all necessary steps to clarify the client’s job target(s) and make sure they were aware of what was possible with a single resume (if they didn’t purchase multiple versions for multiple targets).
    1. I educated clients on what they needed to do to target their resumes for each position. This doesn’t have to take a lot of time. You can create one tip sheet and include it as a value-added bonus with the resume.
    1. This is critical: I never pitched a stand-alone resume service except in rare cases where the candidate had an interview and was told he needed a better resume. Even then I made sure he knew if the job didn’t work out to come back because the resume was just one piece of the strategic job search strategy.

    Now, don’t get me wrong here. You may not currently offer job search strategy to your clients and you may not want to broach that learning curve. That’s OK. But if you want to reduce your risk in client dissatisfaction and chargebacks, you’ve GOT to make sure they are clear that the resume is not a magic bullet. Many job seekers REALLY believe that this is the case. I’ve heard hundreds say over the years, “I know if I just get a really good resume I can get in the door and do the rest.” This isn’t true! Most of them have NO CLUE how to get in the door. They plan on applying to what appears to be low hanging fruit in job opportunities posted on the Internet. This is the LEAST effective method of getting interviews. When you couple this with applying for jobs the resume isn’t targeted to or for which the candidate isn’t fully qualified, you have a recipe for disaster. You have a reason for the client to blame the resume.

    So you’ve got to make sure your clients understand up front that their resume is the beautiful Mercedes that will not run for them unless they also have the engine, or job search strategy.

    Just because you don’t want to or can’t offer job search strategy, there are many ways to still educate your clients:

    1. Resell a program like HIRED! The Ultimate Job Search course. Programs like this are offered at a monthly licensing fee or wholesale rate so you can give your clients the tools while creating a nice additional profit center for yourself. (Find offers like this in CDI’s B2B Service Providers page).
    2. Identify some great job search books and purchase them to bundle in your package, or make a list of them to gift your clients with the understanding that they will NEED these to know what to do with the resume.
    3. Develop a referral relationship or partnership with a coach within CDI. This can also lead to added profits through referral fees or profit sharing. Visit CDI’s Find a Career Pro database to look for matches.

    The bottom line is that most job seekers believe the resume is a one-stop to success and if you don’t alter that belief you will potentially find yourself battling with dissatisfaction, frustration, chargebacks, or refunds.

    However, I’ve still found that no matter how well I’ve prepared my clients for the fact that they NEED this strategy and that the resume isn’t the end-all-be-all solution, some still don’t buy packages and many operate with selective memory.

    Thus, no matter how well you have educated your clients there are still going to be some who come back and say, “It’s not working”.

    If you set up your clients appropriately to understand the resume’s role as a cog in the machine, then this gets to be an exploratory situation of gently reminding them of effective resume usage and offering the services they didn’t take advantage of originally. This doesn’t have to be a refund or chargeback scenario. This can instead be an opportunity for greater client satisfaction and additional profit.

    Let me share a story of one of my clients:

    I once worked with an engineer who was relocating from Boston, MA to Florida. We created a targeted resume and supplemental documents, and even did the research for understanding the cost of living differential in the different markets so he wouldn’t outprice himself. However, he declined job search and interview strategy assistance as he had a plan. So off he went.

    A few months later I heard from him and he was frustrated and shared the patented line, “My resume isn’t working.” Since he caught me by phone I said, “I’m sorry to hear that. Why don’t you tell me what you’ve been doing?” He explained that he’d come down to Florida and gone to job fairs. He dressed his best, went to the right company booths, let them know he was interested, and handed in his resume.” He then waited to hear back but had no responses.

    OK, because I know what works and doesn’t work in job search (I urge resume writers to at least read one great overview book like Job Search that Knocks ‘Em Dead), I immediately saw the problem in his strategy. The short version is that there was nothing memorable here – he would be one of hundreds or even thousands of candidates to do the same thing and turn their resumes over at the job fair. Then the HR person would go back to the office, now a day further delayed in work, and have all these resumes to process. Spending the time and money to travel for these job fairs was little better than submitting to online openings. After I gently and professionally explained this to him without any defensiveness or accusation, I could then let him know that there was nothing wrong with the resume and that to change any of it would not serve him.

    Then I could move on to the fact that there was an effective strategy that I could give him for job fairs, which I then went on to outline and provide the fees for. He ended up with an hour of job search strategy on how to approach those job fair booths to make an impression and how to follow up, along with a folded business card sized resume to clip onto his full resume and use as a teaser. Employers he impressed couldn’t help but have to look at this unique thing he had included. Now prepared, he went out and immediately landed interviews.

    A nice win-win!

    But, in my private practice coaching resume and career professionals, this topic of client dissatisfaction and whether to refund comes up over and over. Again, I see repeatedly that it has nothing to do with the resume but is all in how the candidate is using it. So, I’ve been sharing my scripts with these clients and now want to share them with you. It saves a lot of time and can ease through what might otherwise be an emotionally-charged situation. I’m providing the raw text below for three different scripts (multiple scenarios) and welcome you to adapt them and use them in emails or conversations. Further, you could also convert them into a reverse tip sheet to give clients at the consultation to show why they NEED to invest in job search strategy.

    The bottom line is that you simply have a plan of response that doesn’t involve you working for free or suffering refunds or chargebacks when/if you did the best job possible the first time. Obviously, if you know you didn’t that’s a whole different story and one I’d urge you to overcome and improve.

    Here are your raw scripts:

    BLAMING THE RESUME: GENERAL NOT GETTING INTERVIEWS

    <Insert Greeting>

    I am sorry to hear of your lack of response to your resume.

    Since you said you were responding to ads, I would assume that this means you are only following the posting and submitting your resume to the HR department as requested.

    While you do want to do that, it’s also going to be critical to broaden the amount of legwork you perform in targeting the positions you are really interested in (on a scale of A, B, C and D.

    The A and B positions should have more steps to also get a copy of the resume in front of the actual department director). Additionally, building rapport with HR departments and being the squeaky wheel that gets the grease can sometimes get you pulled out of a black hole.

    Why do I say black hole? HR departments (and recruiters) receive hundreds to thousands of resumes in response to a job ad (Google has actually received as many as 70,000 unsolicited resumes in just one week with no ads). The HR personnel I have spoken to since the Internet became big in job search, including one yesterday who was previously with Disney and AOL, state that on average they are able to open and look at only 5-15% of the resumes they receive. Therefore, no matter how fabulous a resume and how targeted a cover letter, if it falls into that black hole of being the other 85-95% that never even gets opened, it does you no good. This volume is why job seekers rarely even get a ‘dear john’ letter in response to their resume anymore – companies can’t hire enough staff to deal with the volume.

    Sometimes job seekers get lucky and they are that 5-15% the first time and have a quick job search (of course this is what we want). But frequently, if the resume isn’t even getting looked at in this high-volume, easy distribution environment brought on by the Web, diversification becomes absolutely necessary meaning:

    1. Directly target companies and decision makers at companies where you want to work (through research), not just where there are ads (where interest and volume and competition are therefore HIGH).
    2. Network and look at pulling out the ‘who do you know’ to make contacts. Don’t know anyone? Get out there with professional associations, both local and online.
    3. Take extra steps to build rapport with HR when there is a job opportunity or it’s a company you are interested in. This takes sheer persistence as they can be resistant. Follow up with calls and wear them down to remember you.
    4. Target the resume and cover letter specifically to the position. If you aren’t targeting keywords, job titles, and content effectively, you won’t survive human reviews, computer scans or ATS systems.

    Important: make sure that you are applying for jobs that you are qualified for. In my point #4 above I talk about targeting. However, if we wrote your resumes to get an “oranges” <insert job title/type) and you are applying for an “apples” <insert job title/type> position, your resume will never work.

    Another point about ads themselves: Job ads get taken out for a number of reasons that don’t necessarily mean a bona fide job is available (or that it is available at this time). It’s a lot like when a company exhibits at a job fair but strangely is not hiring at that time; they just want to be seen. Reasons for ads that might not result in a call for you or could just simply delay the call:

    1. Company was testing the market to see what it was like at this time for candidate availability (this happens all the time).
    2. Company terminated budget on the position or has put a freeze on hiring (surprisingly, also happens a lot; I’ve seen people mid-interview and offer suddenly be told it’s a freeze or we wanted to line up candidates but are still waiting for budget approval on the hire).
    3. Company is really slow. Feedback I have received (and personally experienced at one time) is that it can sometimes take up to six months for a company to follow up on ad responses – they have a freeze, they become overwhelmed with candidate responses, they find they are too busy and put it on hold).
    4. Position was advertised for EEOC requirements but is actually earmarked for a particular individual already and therefore will not result in any interviews.
    5. Company decides to promote from within (also happens more often have you’d think).

    I share this with you because it’s easy to be discouraged and wonder why it isn’t working. There are so many hidden factors to the process. Bottom line, however, is that if you focus on ads or passive job search strategies, your chances of your resume being viewed are extremely minimal. You’ve got to get it viewed! Therefore, you’ve got to take on much more proactive search methods.

    As we discussed in our consultation (I know that was a while ago and we’ve covered so much). Your resume is like a beautiful Mercedes without an engine. It looks good and people would admire it if they could see it. But without an engine it’s stuck in the driveway. Effective job search, interviewing and negotiation strategy is your engine. You’ve got to invest in those tools to make your job search car run to the finish line.

    If you are interested in exploring the process, we can set up a call. Here is a link to my calendar. I have options we can discuss ranging from $47 to 1500.

    As far as the resume goes, I wouldn’t worry about it being the issue or make strides to change it because it is everything strategic that works. (Caveat – if you are wanting to pursue jobs that we didn’t target your resume for, then we need to address this with a resume re-focus process). Otherwise, please know that I gave 110% of expertise, research and strategy to provide you with a resume that works – when it can be seen. My clients have success because as a <insert credential(s) or awards> I’ve proven to know what it takes to land the interview (and the job). So, please take my advice about targeting the resume and opting for more progressive job search.

    If you still have questions on your resume, want to look at tailoring a job search or interviewing strategy to you, or need to retarget your resume for positions we did not discuss, please let me know. I’ll be glad to handle questions on your resume by email and set up a 15 minute phone consultation to discuss the other options.

    You’ve got an awesome resume and now you just need an awesome strategy to match! You can do this!

    Sincerely,

    <Insert Signature Block>

    BLAMING THE RESUME: GOT THE INTERVIEW BUT NOT THE JOB

    BLAMING THE RESUME: RECRUITERS NOT BITING ON RESUME

    BLAMING THE RESUME: APPLYING FOR POSITIONS OUT OF THE REALM OF RESUME TARGETING

    <Insert Greeting>

    I am sorry to hear you are having difficulties. I am going to begin by providing some details regarding your resume and the project we consulted on as well as some recommendations on the job search and understanding how that could also be holding you back. I’ll also touch on interviewing and what the problem might be there.

    #1 – What interviews not turning into job offers is saying:

    You mention in your email that you have had interviews that did not turn into job offers. The bottom-line in getting to the interview is that the resume did its job, which is to get you in the door. At some point the prospective employer saw you had what they wanted and gave you a chance to prove it in the interview. If a job offer doesn’t emerge, it means you did not sell yourself effectively enough. This has nothing to do with the resume but does tell us the resume works. You should strongly consider working on your interview skills. As we discussed in your consultation session, this is a service I provide and can assist you with.

    #2 – How your job search could be impacting your results:

    Many times the way we search for a job can be a detriment to our success beyond that of the resume.

    For instance, you mention talking to recruiters. However, a recruiter is always seeking to find the ‘perfect match’ for a job – someone who is an absolute expert that the company he/she represents will be willing to pay for. Recruiters rarely work with someone who is a generalist or whose options are open since that doesn’t fit their system. They will require you to be one thing and one thing only, which means again going back and creating targeted versions.

    Further, if you are limiting yourself to primarily applying for open job positions, not only might your resume be too general for a specific <insert job title>, but it might not even be getting opened due to the volume the company receives.

    While you do want to do that, it’s also going to be critical to broaden the amount of legwork you perform in targeting the positions you are really interested in (on a scale of A, B, C and D.

    The A and B positions should have more steps to also get a copy of the resume in front of the actual department director). Additionally, building rapport with HR departments and being the squeaky wheel that gets the grease can sometimes get you pulled out of a black hole.

    Why do I say black hole? HR departments (and recruiters) receive hundreds to thousands of resumes in response to a job ad (Google has actually received as many as 70,000 unsolicited resumes in just one week with no ads). The HR personnel I have spoken to since the Internet became big in job search, including one yesterday who was previously with Disney and AOL, state that on average they are able to open and look at only 5-15% of the resumes they receive. Therefore, no matter how fabulous a resume and how targeted a cover letter, if it falls into that black hole of being the other 85-95% that never even gets opened, it does you no good. This volume is why job seekers rarely even get a ‘dear john’ letter in response to their resume anymore – companies can’t hire enough staff to deal with the volume.

    Sometimes job seekers get lucky and they are that 5-15% the first time and have a quick job search (of course this is what we want). But frequently, if the resume isn’t even getting looked at in this high-volume, easy distribution environment brought on by the Web, diversification becomes absolutely necessary meaning:

    1. Directly target companies and decision makers at companies where you want to work (through research), not just where there are ads (where interest and volume and competition are therefore HIGH).
    2. Network and look at pulling out the ‘who do you know’ to make contacts. Don’t know anyone? Get out there with professional association local chapters.
    3. Take extra steps to build rapport with HR when there is a job opportunity or it’s a company you are interested in. This takes sheer persistence as they can be resistant. Follow up with calls and wear them down to remember you.
    4. Target the resume and cover letter specifically to the position. If you aren’t targeting keywords, job titles, and content effectively, you won’t survive human reviews, computer scans or ATS systems. Take the time to target the resume from the generalist feel to the specialist feel.

    Another point about ads themselves: Job ads get taken out for a number of reasons that don’t necessarily mean a bona fide job is available (or that it is available at this time). It’s a lot like when a company exhibits at a job fair but strangely is not hiring at that time; they just want to be seen. Reasons for ads that might not result in a call for you or could just simply delay the call:

    1. Company was testing the market to see what it was like at this time for candidate availability (this happens all the time).
    2. Company terminated budget on the position or has put a freeze on hiring (surprisingly, also happens a lot; I’ve seen people mid-interview and offer suddenly be told it’s a freeze or we wanted to line up candidates but are still waiting for budget approval on the hire).
    3. Company is really slow. Feedback I have received (and personally experienced at one time) is that it can sometimes take up to six months for a company to follow up on ad responses – they have a freeze, they become overwhelmed with candidate responses, they find they are too busy and put it on hold).
    4. Position was advertised for EEOC requirements but is actually earmarked for a particular individual already and therefore will not result in any interviews.
    5. Company decides to promote from within (also happens more often have you’d think).

    I share this with you because it’s easy to be discouraged and wonder why it isn’t working. There are so many hidden factors to the process. Bottom line, however, is that if you focus on ads or passive job search strategies, your chances of your resume being viewed are extremely minimal. You’ve got to get it viewed! Therefore, you’ve got to take on much more proactive search methods.

    III. How does what you are applying for match the resume?

    Applying for a job and successfully getting an interview means being a strong match to that job. If you recall during our first sessions I expressed to you that you needed multiple versions of your resume because you wanted to apply for too many different things with one tool, including roles in which you had no experience. You opted to have me create an ‘overall’ <insert job title> resume that would showcase all the different <insert position/industry> -oriented skills you had to offer in the hopes that when submitting it or networking with it that there would be a match.

    At that point I stressed to you that when you applied for specific and non-generalist roles that you carefully evaluate the job description and make changes to the resume to be a stronger match to the one target.

    For example:

    You use the generalist resume to apply for a <insert position title> position. Someone else who has only done <targeted skill> as their one specialty also applies for the job. So, who is the better match? When your resume is reviewed it plays up multiple <insert generalist title> functions and not just <targeted skill> so it is seen that you are not a 100% match and that you might actually prefer a role where you do more than just <targeted skill>. The other candidate is just training so they are a sure thing.

    Now, what I had hoped to get across was that this is something you can overcome but it requires you to make the changes to the resume that we would have originally made if you had done multiple versions. However, if you are applying for some of the jobs where there is no match such as <insert job title>, you will be hard-pressed to demonstrate a match without completely rewriting this resume. But, we discussed that up front and you opted to leave out that target and go for the <insert job title> areas with the resume we created.

    How can you target the resume?

    Read the ad carefully then look at the header line. Should you change it from <job title> to something specific like <job title> to match the job?

    Next, look at your summary. Does it match the job? If not, look to adjust it to specifically position the qualifications and strengths you have for that job and not all <insert general job title>.

    Now review the key words. The ones most relevant to the target position should appear first; ones that totally over-qualify you should be removed. Specific strengths the job asks for that you have but that were not relevant to any other position should be added.

    Finally, review your work history. Is there anything you can take out that’s not relevant and over-qualifies you? Can you change the order of any bullets to make sure that more relevant ones appear earlier in the list?

    Again, this is not going to work for jobs you have no experience in such as <job title>. It is going to work best on positions that fall within the <title/industry> areas in which you have experience. That’s not to say that you couldn’t have a resume for <job title>, but it would be very different using a chrono-functional approach vs. a functional approach.

    Why is all this important?

    Because employers see you as what you show them. There is nothing wrong with a generalist resume because it can lead to a generalist position, a management position, a position similar to your last role (first one described chronologically) and sometimes a niche position in one area of the competencies. But, the individuals reviewing a resume are looking for a strong match to the job they have open. If that is not a <job title> but a specific specialty, then there will most likely always be an applicant who shows a perfect match while you, without targeting and staying general, show a semi-match or a match but one that is left with the question of whether you will be happy in just that one role.

    1. Final comments on resume:

    With all that being said, we created the scope of document that you wished to have originally. I can see absolutely nothing wrong with it for the <job title> resume we agreed on to keep your <industry> options open without the added cost / purchase of multiple targeted resumes. If you want to revert back to the originally recommended strategy of creating some targeted specialty versions, that could be done for an additional fee of <insert amount> per version. But, I did describe above how you could do it yourself, if preferred.

    Beyond that, I am not sure how I could assist you. The resume, for what we were targeting, is excellent and I cannot see how we would change it except to create targeted versions.

    If you have specific requests that fall in the arena of the <insert job title resume was created for>, I would be glad to make them although it will probably be against my better judgment since I think the resume is perfect for what you could do with only one version.

    Please note that if I disagree and find the changes you want to be damaging to your resume and strategy, that I will need you to sign a release that states you understand changes have been undertaken that will hinder your job search.

    Again, I think the challenge falls in customizing the resume if you apply for specialist roles and in maximizing the methods of job search utilized. I can help with either, and would be glad to have a quick consultation to discuss options and prices. Please let me know how I can assist you!

    Thank you.

    Sincerely,

    <Insert Signature Block>

    BLAMING RESUME: ALL OVER THE BOARD (TEASING YOUR SERVICES WITH A FREE GIFT)

    <Insert Greeting>

    I am sorry to hear of the challenges you have been facing in your job search. I have revisited the resume and feel that there is no better tool we could have created for <insert job title> roles. Here are some things to think about:

    #1 – Where are you sending the resumes for advertised roles?

    If you are sending them only via email to the address listed (except when you don’t know who the company is), then expect that they are so overwhelmed with potentially thousands of responses that virtually only about 5-15% will ever even be viewed. It is important to rank the positions you apply for and those that are top 25% require extra steps; almost private detective work to uncover who the decision maker is so that you can bypass the screening entity of human resources and get your resume in front of the actual hiring manager.

    #2 – Are you applying for roles below what your resume positions you for?

    The opening section of your resume tries to balance you for roles other than <insert job level/position> management but your work history is all <insert specific job level/position> and many of your emphasized unique strengths are as well; also, the cover letter is targeted this way too. Therefore, a <insert job title> role may see you as overqualified and not interview you as they assume you will move on as soon as a <insert job level/position> role arises. You might try to retarget or you might limit your focus to jobs that fit your level.

    #3 – Is the company seeking some kind of specialty?

    I noticed that some of the positions you applied for had preferred industry qualifications. It’s a buyer’s market out there with approximately 55% of those employed looking for better positions. Therefore, a company may find applicants who are a ‘best’ match and contact them first.

    There are a number of other factors such as:

    • Companies are just testing the market and not currently hiring;
    • Many hiring cycles take much longer than a month and you could get a call as far out as six months later because it gets put aside;
    • Companies become overwhelmed and do not hire at the time, go into a freeze after posting the ad, or promote someone inside;
    • The job was just posted to seemingly fill EEOC but a candidate was already selected; and
    • The possibility that some may not like your career progression. We have definitely capitalized on the positive assets of what you did in the <insert challenge such as temp / short-term roles>, but someone looking for a <job title> may still not like it when pressed with other candidates.

    My recommendation is that you:

    1. Target the employers you want to work for, identify the hiring authority, and do the mailing as described in #1 directly to them.
    2. When responding to online ads or doing direct mail, take additional steps to get your resume in front of an actual hiring authority by doing research on the ads that are top 25% or 100-90% matches to your employment goals or the companies you are targeting.
    3. Consider getting involved in networking at local <insert professional association> meetings to find out about internal positions with real referring people vs. ads with high competition.
    4. If you stick to the direct mail of emailing / mailing to HR, then pick the ones you are really interested in and create a relationship with the HR department. Can take much repeated calls to wear them down. Otherwise, you need to be applying to about 100 jobs/companies a week to have the volume to have the strategy of just answering ads or sending blind to HR really pay off.

    For some, which is what we all prefer, the resume is a magic bullet. But if you are in a highly aggressive, which is <insert industry>, and saturated market, which is also <insert industry>, where competition is high and resumes don’t necessarily get seen, you may have to do more or luck out about being in the right place at the right time. Or, at least not let it get you down when it doesn’t work rapidly like we would like. It is not your qualifications or achievements, or your resume as they are all stellar. Yes, there is still that concern with the chronology issue of the <insert challenge such as temp roles>, but not enough to be a permanent bar, especially with how we set it up.

    I am attaching a short e-book on networking that may be of help, which I typically only provide to clients who are involved in job search coaching. I will also give you the courtesy of a few resources for free recruiter searching and a few other sites. Only note that recruiters may not be excited about your work history but it still can’t hurt to try because what you have done with those companies is strong.

    I’d like to help you with setting up a strategy that will work for you. As you may recall, we discussed my job search and interview consulting services in our first session. I would estimate we would need two sessions to get you set up with a specific, targeted strategy to know you are confidently targeting positions and to start landing interviews. I have time tomorrow if you would like to have a brief discussion about this, cost, and expectations.

    I know you are going to be successful and I am sorry that I don’t have one magic easy solution. I have hundreds of easy success stories, but luck of the draw does not always come out that way no matter how good we look. In those cases it comes down to perseverance and diversification. Stay in the game and don’t stop five seconds before the miracle.

    I hope you find the attached resources of benefit. Please let me know if you would like to discuss further consulting and strategy services. Wishing you the success you deserve in a much quicker manner!

    <Insert Signature Block>

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    Learning on Demand with instant access to over 70 hours of online/MP3 expert webinars and teleseminars. Free to members

    Exclusive Reports and insider secrets on industry business, resume writing, online identity, and key areas that lead to your success (view sample report). Free to members

    Award Competitions which exclusively position your business as a leader and create a business magnet for new clients (learn more). Fee

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    Enhanced Visibility to Job Seekers via multi-point searchable database, blog authorship (4000+ unique hits), press releases, and marketing, publishing and social media opportunities. Free to members

    Hottest Trends, Tools, Tips, and Opportunities delivered to your email with monthly Core Classes and Great Industry Resources. Free to members

    High Octane Learning and Networking with CDI’s Entrepreneurial Success Secrets for resume and career pros (learn more). Fee

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    Additional Resources on This Topic

    Grab My Scripts & Strategy for “My resume isn’t working” (Core Lesson) >> – same scripts but some added information on job search

    3-Step Process to a 97% Close Rate and a 6-Figure Income (Core Lesson) >> – The six-figure consult script

    Closing Prospects Over the Phone for Resume Services (Core Lesson)>> – Using the script in virtual sessions

    Freebie Add-Ons to Increase Sales and Package Value (Best Practice Tip)>> – Add value to packages with freebie add-ons

    Capturing Client Testimonials and Powerful Follow Up (Audio + Tracking Form)>> – Capture stronger testimonials

    Career Business Profit Rocket 1-1 Consulting>> – When you want an individualized approach and support

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